The White River

The White River, W.E. Pidgeon c.1938
Provenance

For some years now I was aware of one of Wep’s paintings titled The White River but had no idea what it looked like. It came up for auction in 2002 and the provenance detail showed it had been purchased by Sir Daryl Lindsay from Artlovers Gallery in Artarmon for the I.C.I. Art Collection. Lindsay was an artist and member of the famous Lindsay family and a former Director of the National Gallery of Victoria (1941-1956). Wep’s archives reveal the painting was sold May 1st, 1958 and his proceeds were £29.8.0. The asking price was probably 40gns (£42).

Cheque from Artlovers for £29.8.0 for sale of “The White River”, 1st May 1958

The I.C.I. Art Collection, later known as the Orica Art Collection was purchased by Kerry Stokes for $13 million in December 2001. In August 2002 Sotheby’s Australia auctioned a number of works from the Kerry Stokes Collection including works formerly in the Orica Collection. The painting was then held in a private collection and was re-framed by Maitland Heritage Frames and Art Supplies. In 2005 it was offered for sale in the Hunter Valley Grammar Festival of the Arts. It remained in a private collection until March 2019 when it was offered for sale by Lawsons Fine Art. This was an ideal opportunity to reunite the painting with the family collection of Wep’s artworks.

Location

I was curious to identify the location of The White River, especially as this was a descriptive name, rather than a geographical name. I suspected it was the Snowy River near Jindabyne.

Going through Wep’s paper archives and photos appears to confirm the location is indeed the Snowy River near to the site where Bill and Jess camped in their caravan in 1937. It was also where they took the humorist Lennie Lower in the caravan in 1938. Photographs and other works present a similar landscape to that of The White River. The site is just north of the former road bridge across the Snowy River, now well and truly submerged beneath Lake Jindabyne.

The Snowy River at Jindabyne, believed to be just north of the original bridge, now under Lake Jindabyne where Wep and Jess Pidgeon made camp during their visit with Lennie Lower in 1938.
Bridge over the Snowy River, Jindabyne, May-June 1937
Dating the work

When the painting was offered for sale in 2002, the date was listed as c.1958. I was not so sure about that. The only works Wep sold ‘fresh’ were commissioned portraits or illustrations.  In early 1958 Wep had at least five works on the go. It was also the year he painted Ray Walker, his first Archibald Prize winner. He was fairly busy at the time and unlikely to be dabbling on the side with one of his more favoured pastimes, landscape painting. More likely his friend, John Brackenreg, who owned and ran Artlovers Gallery (now Artarmon Galleries), asked Bill if he had any works which he could offer for display/sale. Alternatively, Bill needed some ready cash to keep things going and approached John with a painting he was willing to let go. Usually in these situations he would look for a suitable painting (as he was not one to exhibit or sell), possibly add some finishing touches and then sign it.

Painting style

In 1937 Wep went on a six-month sabbatical to discover and develop his painting style; mainly landscapes. In his journal he describes how some paintings do not work, some are painted over. Many have distinctive characteristics of Van Gogh and Monet and other Impressionists. He even describes how in one work, “the tortured rhythm of tree form having driven me unconsciously into semblance of Van Gogh technique: can’t see how else I could have done it.” However, this particular painting, the flow of paint and brush style is more typical of Wep’s own approach. So it is unlikely to have been attempted in 1937 during the caravan trip but possibly in 1938 when visiting with Lower or soon afterwards as Wep’s regular annual trips to the Snowy Mountains waned from 1938 onward.

Signature

Another point that suggests the work is much earlier than 1958 is the signature “wepidgeon”. Initially Wep signed all his works as “wep”, of which there are several distinct period styles. However, come the 1930s, only illustrations and cartoons were signed “wep” and his paintings, if signed, usually bore the signature “wepidgeon”. Upon leaving Consolidated Press in 1948 to concentrate on portrait painting, Wep made a definitive change to his painting signature to distance himself from the illustrator/cartoonist known as “wep”. From this point onward, all his paintings were simply signed as “pidgeon”. This suggests the painting is at least earlier than 1948. Given the subject matter, the most likely date is c.1938.

Other reference images
Lennie Lower cooking some chops beside the Snowy River at Jindabyne, May-June 1938
Lennie Lower wading in the Snowy River at Jindabyne, May-June 1938

[Snowy River near Jindabyne], W.E. Pidgeon 1937
[Snowy River near Jindabyne], W.E. Pidgeon 1937
[Snowy River near Jindabyne], W.E. Pidgeon 1937

Please follow and like us: